Baxter, Vera Baxter (Marguerite Duras, 1977)

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"

Something I really liked from the Q&A last night was when you referred to Pasolini as a prophet. Willem, you’ve played a lot of iconic figures but a prophet almost exists in another ballpark. It so clearly shone through that you both admired Pasolini deeply, and most of all did not want to cause the slightest bit of injustice to his name. So how do you play a prophet?

Dafoe: You don’t. You try to, once again, inhabit those ideas. And the only way you can express them is to have an affinity and an understanding. To will yourself to have an understanding. That becomes the work. I always feel like as an actor, my job is not to express my experience but to go towards something that’s not my experience and to have a relationship to it and as I go towards it I’m transformed. And that transformation is what fuels the inner life of the performance. I want to be transformed because I want to learn a different way of thinking and a different way of seeing, and when you have someone as brilliant as Pasolini it’s a beautiful opportunity to be transformed in a way that’s inspiring. Hopefully there’s some taste of that in the movie. When people see it they remember things that they forgot and learn things that they never thought. Because some of his ideas are expressed and there’s enough little flavour about how he led his life that that’s also inspiring. He had some dark aspects too and lots of contradictions but I think that whole process of going towards his thoughts is really what invests that feeling of him being a prophet. Because once you sit with all those things he’s saying I start to see them going on all over the place. He was right, he called it. What’s happening to society is still happening. He said it: we’re all in danger. Not to be a flat-out pessimist but I think the evolution of society, from a false sense of progress, in some ways we’re going backwards. We’re losing our humanity.

Ferrara: Did you get that on tape or are you going to remember all of that?

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Beep (Kim Kyung-man, 2014)

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Girlhood (Celine Sciamma, 2014)

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Still the Water (Naomi Kawase, 2014)

Still the Water (Naomi Kawase, 2014)

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The Keeping Room (Daniel Barber, 2013)

The Keeping Room (Daniel Barber, 2013)

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'We No Who U R' is taken from the Cold Specks 'Bodies At Bay' digital single which is released on September 15.The song was originally recorded by Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds and features on their 2013 album 'Push The Sky Away'

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Horse Money (Pedro Costa, 2014)

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Puritan names from a Sussex jury roll of 1650:

thestuartkings:

  • Accepted Trevor, of Norsham
  • Redeemed Compton, of Battle
  • Kill-Sin Pimple, of Witham
  • Fly-Fornication Richardson, of Waldron
  • Search-The-Scriptures Moreton, of Salehurst
  • The-Peace-Of-God Knight, of Burwash
  • Stand-Fast-On-High Stringer, of Crowhurst

(via majimanidoo)

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bollywoodbloodbaths:

deeply in2 this whole ‘doom soul’ thing

same

From the top to the bottom: Cold Specks from the video for Absisto, Weaves from the video for Take a Dip, Ibeyi from the video for River, Mirel Wagner from the video for No Death, Cold Specks again from the video for Hector.

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